Skelanimals Team Up with PETA to Go Fur-Free

Skelanimals Team Up with PETA to Go Fur-Free

I love Skelanimals. I used to love PETA, before I decided that they’re too sexist for me. So knowing that PETA is teaming up with Skelanimals to help spread the anti-fur message is a mixed bag for me. I’m anti-fur, and I think it’s a great cause—but when you throw in PETA, you’re just not sure if the message is going to be an actual ethical one or one that completely disrespects and uses women.

The good news is that this campaign is going to be spearheaded by PETA2, the younger generation of PETA, which is more cute than chauvinistic. I have a feeling it’s actually going to be a pretty cute, positive campaign that both grown-ups and kids can get behind. With language like “Animals like fur. They don’t want to die so someone else can wear it,” it’s a non-polarizing message that kids can understand without the fear-mongering scare tactics and bloody images that PETA is usually known for. I commend them for approaching this issue in such a friendlier way, especially since it’s an issue that we really need to fight and teach kids about. Focusing on compassion and facts, rather than gore and nightmare-inducing imagery, is definitely the route to not only reach children, but adults, too.

At the Skelanimals/PETA2 site, you can find which Skelanimal you are, buy a “Fur is Dead” Skelanimal/PETA2 t-shirt, and take action against companies that currently sell or support fur.  There is a very graphic video when you click the “What’s Wrong With Fur?” link that includes people beating and killing animals for their fur. Parents may want to watch this video first before allowing young children to see it; they may find it okay for their teens—which is who PETA2 is really intended for, I believe—to see as long as they can talk about it with them, too.

Of course, you don’t need Skelanimals or PETA to talk to kids about the wrongness of fur; you can simply show them that it’s wrong by not purchasing it, wearing it, or supporting it. Explain that you don’t shop at places that sell fur, and use your own pets to highlight how wrong it would be to steal someone else’s skin. Heck, my own daughter learned about fur from the film 101 Dalmatians, and she was immediately against it; children normally are. They can spot cruelty much more easily than adults can sometimes—and they are often much more against it, and about speaking out about it, than we are, too.